Juba Lectures Day 3: South Sudan’s death penalty; free speech; the role of traditional law

The podcasts for all of the Juba Lectures 2013 are available online to download for free – and it’s worthwhile, as the debates this week have been dominated by South Sudanese voices asking questions and making strong points about how they see (or want to see) the basis of Southern political, cultural and social life built in the constitution.

Last night’s debate focused mainly on the basis of laws – and therefore social and political justice – in South Sudan.  Much of the conversation revolved around the death penalty, still legal and carried out regularly here; execution – and the ability of which courts, traditional or legislative, to carry it out – served as a focal point for concerns over how conservative Southern society should be; whether “traditional” justice should be changed fast or actually codified and preserved as is; and the inability of youth and other marginalised people to challenge older generations and vested systems.

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Filed under Current affairs, Politics, South Sudan

One response to “Juba Lectures Day 3: South Sudan’s death penalty; free speech; the role of traditional law

  1. Pingback: Aweil research: photo journal | internally displaced

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